ORGAN THING: Trumpet blowing and more blood spilled, another busy art show in a London basement…

A whole load of words, thoughts and images from the Cultivate takeover of BSMT Space gallery over at Dalston last weekend that just appeared over on our sister Organ blog page, wanted ot get some thoughts up as soon as possible, here’s a repost of what was said over on the Organ pages…

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Well that was quite an eventful weekend spent over on the edges of Hackney down in a Dalston basement at the foot of the Stoke Newington Road in amongst all the noise and people of N16. We’re in Monday morning recovery mode now and musing on all that went on, that was eventful! Big thanks to everyone who came to the Debased show, big thanks to all of those who came along for that rather packed opening and thanks to those who made the effort to come explore the exhibition over the long weekend. I think we can say that was a particularly successful (dare we say significant?) one. I think we can say that went rather well can’t we?. Big big thanks to all who made the effort to come along and to all the artists who took part (and to those artists who we couldn’t fit in to the show this time). I think that marked five years of doing it the Cultivate way rather well… we’ll start work on the next shows in a minute, let’s get some thoughts about this one committed to (electronic) paper.

Rather pleased with the artisan flavours we had this time, the cross-pollination of contemporary painters mixing with the graphic sign-writing, the crafted gilding, the hand-printed rolls of wallpaper or the fabric delivered with attitude, rather liked all that hanging next to the big canvas pieces and the brush stokes and the delicate details and the bold abstractions, rather liked the mixing of the performance, the painters, the fine art printmakers and street art flavoured illustrators – cross-pollination was the phrase again this weekend – and, yes, the politics, rather proud to have had that powerful Megan Pickering piece right there in the middle of things demanding attention (more about Megan’s powerful piece later on, it deserves an article all to itself later this week)..

debased_sept2016It is no secret that Cultivate is an Organ thing and that we here at the now long-running Organ (almost thirty years of Organ) opened Cultivate as a gallery space some five years ago now – all documented over on the Cultivate blog, Cultivate is now nomadic, Cultivate, like Organ, is ever evolving – so yes, we are blowing our own big-mouthed trumpets here again, so what?! The goings on of the last five days deserve some trumpeting and if we don’t do it then who will?

And so five days were spent in a basement art gallery space over in London N16, the opening night was intense (it wasn’t a private view, we open for everyone, we don’t do private view, everyone is welcome at our art shows), the opening was beautiful, and these notes were hammered into a mobile phone in wake during the show over the weekend in between conversations with visitors and…

Marnie Scarlet, post performance, back in the day wear

Marnie Scarlet, post performance, back in the day wear

The cold light of a Dalston Friday almost reaching down in to the BSMT Space basement, the scars of last night almost cleared up, one lone blood-covered piece of slightly mutilated rose left from Amy Kingsmill’s rather challenging piece of performance art. Never has a packed art gallery been so quiet, so transfixed and fully focused (London art audiences are by habit, loud things). Not a word said in the basement, complete silence for Amy’s half-hour performance save for the noise drifting down from the street, from outside the open door, the busy traffic rushing by, the passing of people getting on with their shopping and their rushing home or their rushing out to a bar or just hanging about up there oblivious. A gallery almost stunned, silence as Amy Kingsmill’s white dress turned red and her performance twisted people’s expressions. Of course besides the hundred or so who happened to be in the gallery at the time, no one will really know any of it ever happened, the fadish art press showed their usual lack of interest in what’s really going on week after week right under their noses in spaces like this, the London art maps who never seem to find their way to map these things and such, no sign of the demander of properly written artistic essay either, must have been busy arranging her footnotes and making sure her academic pontificating was all formally correct and that all signs of excitement are removed from the process of (writing about) art, that or she had a headache, she’s being saying she’s too ill to make it this week for five years or so now. Why is it that the London art media so very very rarely actually gets out and covers the actual art that’s happening? Surely nothing to do with who pays for advertising space and who doesn’t? Surely that cynical Art Map page doesn’t run like that?

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Chain of thought broken down in the gallery by Mr Yogi, a passing fortune-teller, I do like this space on the crossroads where Kingsland Road turns into Stoke Newington High Street, just beyond all the colourful noise of mercifully ungentrified Ridley Road Market (catch it while you can people, treasure it, I love walking through there, love buying big bags for fruit for half the price you pay in the supermarket, love the noise, the voices), Mr Yogi is the latest of a stream of colourful characters dropping in today – school kids, construction workers, religious pamphlet pushers, the occasional artist, a passing dry-cleaning delivery man supposedly rushing a dress to a customer, said he couldn’t resist the sign outside and a quick look (see galleries, signs outside, they really do work, much better than hiding behind a locked door and an uninviting bell). Mr Yogi failed to get anyone in the gallery to cross his palm with a “small financial tribute”, he was very complimentary though, and rightly so, this is, even if I do say so myself, a rather satisfying show. If last night’s opening was about intensity and attitude, then today has just been about enjoying the art and exploring a whole cross-section of London’s artist-led creative pro-active underground. Sixteen artists hanging on the walls, the art reflecting off the shine of the floor, the art hiding in the beautiful brick alcoves that add so much to this excellent underground art space, sixteen artists who were joined by three performance artists for last night’s rather exciting, rather busy, rather buzzing opening.

Amy kingsmill

Amy kingsmill

This is an important show, for no other reason other than that it opened on Joan Jeff’s birthday, she’d appreciate that Boys Suck piece that threw so many off the scent just when they thought they had worked the artist out. An important show because down here in this basement, this artist-led coming together of a show represents, once again, where the real energy is in terms of the people, the contemporary creativity and the right-here-right-now – a dozen and a half artists sharing wall space, floor space, energy and ideas. Megan Pickering excited to be showing art next to Emma Harvey and her circles, Emma exited to share walls with Bruce Lovelock‘s large painting – “I imagine him as one of those artists who are discovered later on in life with hundreds of works stored away…I like his work, there is a dark strange edge there, I don’t see anything else out there like his work. It poses questions to me, rather than handing it all on a plate I do ‘feel’ from Bruce’s work…”. Quiet British Accent, Jane Mutiny and her pumping hearts and herons, a table full of prints, zines – Jane Laurie AKA the street artist known as Mutiny has been painting her hearts and endangered species on the walls if London all summer and this weekend she’s up on the wall next to Ian Bailey‘s deliciously rich hand-printed rebellious wallpapers – dare we say the punk rock William Morris? Love having Ian’s work on the wall, brilliant. .

Emma Harvey

Emma Harvey

These are the people who have recovered from the tedious bindings of art school, the rules and the restrictions, the chains of formality and the “correct” way of doing things (I reckon it takes about five years before an ex art student has got real and thrown off the shackles and started to produce something worth engaging with, either that or given up and become an estate agent vitriolically upping the rents and closing down the art spaces they no longer visit or got to hang work in. Of course the art establishment can’t see beyond the end of term degree shows in terms of looking for the exciting new artists, if the establishment gallery machine doesn’t snap you up the minute you graduate then it ignores you for ever more. The London art scene is a fractured thing, the really exciting artists and events are the ones that come together like this one in space like this one, this is where the spirit of Joshua Compston flows on, a better Woolworths, this is art getting on with it without all the uninviting formality and the cold-hearted footnotes.

Marnie Scarlet

Marnie Scarlet

And so Amy Kingsmill’s needles lay of the floor along with the blood and the silence until the music pieced it all and night moved on and evolved again, before Amy Cultivate regular Marnie Scarlet held centre stage with a performance and a dress made from the make-up encrusted tissue wipes of previous encounters, her white face painted by an audience invited to engage and doing so with delighted enthusiasm in-front of the paintings and a crowd packed in and perched on the stairs, squashed in to corners, elbowing with the camera-snappers and the mobile phones that were sharing it all instantly.

Megan Pickering - Breadline

Megan Pickering – Breadline

Meanwhile Apple Tart is wandering around questioning gender in her dress and people are asking questions about the food lists and the reproduced 80’s miner strike leaflets, those who were around at the time explaining to those who weren’t. Megan Pickering is from the mining community of Durham, her piece on the wall is particularly powerful, it was important to place it right in the middle of the show, a place of prominence, not lost in the noise of the other art. A piece of art called Breadline – a piece we had seen before and particularly wanted in this show, I think we’ve said before Megan is one of our favourite London-based artists, her video piece at last year’s Play show was special, all of her appearances at Cultivate have been (we first got to know of Megan when she came in to curate her own group show and few years back, see, all about the energy of artists doing it themselves). Breadline features the lists compiled by the artist’s grandmother while she was in charge of the food parcels and the donations sent in in support of the striking miners and the communities threatened by Thatcher’s hatred back in her days of government – the list of food supplies is powerful, this is a vital piece of art, a vital piece of social documentation – strong statement, important statement, this piece of work really does deserve far more attention than it will ever get down here in one of our shows.

Quiet British Accent

Quiet British Accent

And so a show alive with contradictions, the usual street-art crowd who tend to inhabit BSMT Space are grasping it, well the ones who have bothered to show up, alas many of the regulars have opted not to step outside of their comfort zones, “I usually go but it didn’t look like my thing” said one on-line – well yes, the usual game of street art bingo was not on offer tonight, no bad Bowie stencils or conforming skulls or Star Wars clichés that they like to say are “smashing it” in that street art way that does so amuse – oh but there was the flowing black and white style of This One, the strong urban colour of Rosso and there was the heart-felt beauty of Mutiny and her endangered heron and there was that bloke who repeatedly paints those tag-like leaf-things on found pieces of wood and such recycled from the street and them hangs them back out on the street walls, and you would surely have appreciated the meaty substance of Espira’s pop art and Tesco bags and vintage porn and angelic wit, and that painted penny that Quiet British Accent refused to sell (despite the repeated requests) because it wasn’t about the money – painted penny piece was put out on the Dalston street after the show, attached to a wall, there to be taken, that’s “smashing it”. But then everything must stay in a box and be neatly labeled – this box from the appreciators of contemporary art, that one over for the urban art followers and never the two shall dare to meet and where shall we put Elizabeth Sandford Richardson‘s black and white digital holography in all of this? Her subtle photography, her printmaking, her diffraction that’s evolving, where does that fit in? What is going on here, how dare you cross pollinate like this! Pretty sure Elizabeth came along with Apple Tart, although I never did see the two of them in the same room at the same time.

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yes, this was about cross-pollination, artists uniting and sharing space, contradicting, complimenting, questioning, outside the rules and pigeonholes – the painterly colour, the portraits and the bright (bright) wearable art of Diane Goldie (do like the creative questions Diane constantly throws out), the ever evolving Matisse-flavoured colour and cut out shape of Swiss artist and music maker Christopher Cachelin (AKA Kidd Feather), the dark mystery (and taxidermy) of Mia-Jane Harris hiding delightfully in the corner arch waiting to be explored, the bold personality and rich colour of Rosso, her punk rock edge there on her big bright canvas, her wearing of everything on her painted metaphorical sleeve. There’s a strong defiant smile to Rosso’s painting, a developing self-awareness, a need to convey her hope, her fear, her excitement, her questions.

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And then there’s Deborah Griffin‘s sailing of her pirate ship (was it a pirate ship or was that just me reading that wholesome blackness?), her big self-portrait, the artist as a sailing ship (surely a pirate ship?), do love Deborah’s work, never know what she will bring when invited but it is always rewarding and with a slight gothic undercurrent that it so good to drink in, a painterly style like nobody else, we always delight in asking her back There’s Lynne Blackburn‘s previously documented craft, her high-end contemporary print making there in the frames hanging on the brickwork, her celebration or mark and colour that is so much more than just mark and colour and glorious texture when you really take the time to look and yes I am blowing trumpets about the artists we invited to take part, of course I am! There’s a lot of time and effort, argument and debate that goes into the selection (and indeed the hang), into the balance of the show, the potential relationships between the pieces on the wall of the gallery, lots and lots of pulling together – there were others we would have loved to ask but would they fit with this particular body of the work and this group of artists in this particular space?

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And so another Cultivate show happened (there’s been about 150 of them now and she’s been too ill this week to make any of them), this time it happened in a basement space in Dalston and a take over of the BSMT Space gallery. Sixteen artists shared the walls, some performance artists performed on the opening night, lots of people came along, a triumph art show happened – maximalism, cross-pollination, positive contradiction, punk rock, trumpet blowing – a good time was had, some thought-provoking was thrown out along with the entertainment, the beauty, the darkness, the politics, the creativity and a barb or two. The man in the red hat didn’t come, neither did anyone of the pontificating speakers from the Art Conference who like to tell us what’s going on, the art-fair art pimps who send out the e.mails telling us how much they “love your work and you can have a couple of inches of badly lit wall space for a couple of days if you part with a couple of hundred notes” (well a lot more actually), non of those art-pimps made it – lots of people did come though, lots of real people made it, lots of art happened, debate took place, smiles on faces, pieces sold, friendly argument on the merits of this and that.

Marnie Scarlet

Marnie Scarlet

Mr Yogi said it was good, Mr Yogi was right, and when a show as good as this one happens then an unashemed trumpet or two is going to be loudly blown. Like we keep saying on these organic pages, shows like this are happening almost every week in this city of ours, as fractured and under threat as we artists are, as difficult as space is to find now, art is still very much alive in the back rooms of London and if you’re willing to get out and engage with it then these are very rewarding time. We had a great time in the basement, we’ve had a great time doing this Cultivate thing over the last five or so years, we like being a thorn in your side (sometimes they do indeed have thorns), thanks everyone, thanks for coming, we’re going to blow our own trumpets, now what shall we do next? (SW)

Click on an image to enlarge or to run slide show….

Debased, the artists, part 4, Ian Bailey, rebellious wallpaper printer….

Gill Saunders, curator of prints at the V&A, talking about Ian Bailey’s ‘Rebellion’ wallpaper

Gill Saunders, curator of prints at the V&A, talking about Ian Bailey’s ‘Rebellion’ wallpaper

Debased is almost upon us, we’re rather looking forward to it, I’m especially looking forward to seeing Ian Bailey’s work in the flesh. This will be Ian’s debut in terms of Cultivate. he was last seen at the V&A where some of his wallpaper was on show

Debased in about cross-pollination, about artists who probably don’t cross paths that often sharing space together, we rather like the idea of street artists sharing space with contemporary painters, performers, print makers, dress makers, and in Ian’s case, someone who created beautiful hand printed wallpaper.   There’s something exciting about a good repeat pattern, especially a slightly rebellious one – “Student of the late seventies and still angry. Ian’s art and repeat pattern wallpaper designs are inspired by Pugin, Strummer, Jamie Reid, Ickey, Banksy, Orwell and Delia Smith CBE” I’d throw William Morris in that pot as well but then William is a slightly rebellious hero of mine and I am a frustrated textile designer,  I was delighted when Ian asked if he could take part in Debased, I can’t wait to see his wallpaper hanging next to a This One Canvas or an Emma Harvey painting or one of Adam Espira’s rather strange pieces, I love pulling together a good group show and mixing things up a little. (sw)

CULTIVATE DEBASED at BSMT Space 22-25 September 2016. Opening night: Thursday 22 September, 6pm until 9pm then open: Friday 23, Saturday 24 and Sunday 25 September 11am until – 7pm each day.  at: BSMT Space, 5D Stoke Newington Road, Dalston, London, N16 8BH

debased_sept2016CULTIVATE returns to Dalston and that beautiful basement knows as BSMT Space. In March it was DEBASER and slicing up eye balls, on September 22nd it will be DEBASED. Another gathering of pro-active artists and a maximalist exercise on cross-pollination. A room alive with contemporary painters, so-called street artists, performers, print makers and more…. Artists taking part include: ADAM ESPIRA, AMY KINGSMILLAPPLE TART,  BRUCE LOVELOCK,  CHRISTOPHER CACHELIN (aka Kidd Feather),  DEBORAH GRIFFINDIANE GOLDIEELIZABETH SANDFORD RICHARDSON, EMMA HARVEYIAN BAILEY, MUTINY,  LYNNE BLACKBURN, MARNIE SCARLETTMEGAN PICKERING, MIA-JANE HARRIS, QUIET BRITISH ACCENT,  ROSSO, SEAN WORRALL,  THIS ONE….

Ian Bailey

Ian Bailey

Debased, the artists, part three, Amy Kingsmill, Lynne Blackburn….

Lynne Blackburn - Ghost Building

Lynne Blackburn – Ghost Building

Debased is almost upon us, we’re rather looking forward to it…

CULTIVATE DEBASED at BSMT Space 22-25 September 2016. Opening night: Thursday 22 September, 6pm until 9pm then open: Friday 23, Saturday 24 and Sunday 25 September 11am until – 7pm each day.  at: BSMT Space, 5D Stoke Newington Road, Dalston, London, N16 8BH

CULTIVATE returns to Dalston and that beautiful basement knows as BSMT Space. In March it was DEBASER and slicing up eye balls, on September 22nd it will be DEBASED. Another gathering of pro-active artists and a maximalist exercise on cross-pollination. A room alive with contemporary painters, so-called street artists, performers, print makers and more…. Artists taking part include: ADAM ESPIRA, AMY KINGSMILLAPPLE TART,  BRUCE LOVELOCK,  CHRISTOPHER CACHELIN (aka Kidd Feather),  DEBORAH GRIFFINDIANE GOLDIEELIZABETH SANDFORD RICHARDSON, EMMA HARVEYIAN BAILEY, MUTINY,  LYNNE BLACKBURN, MARNIE SCARLETTMEGAN PICKERING, MIA-JANE HARRIS, QUIET BRITISH ACCENT,  ROSSO, SEAN WORRALL,  THIS ONE….

Here’s a third small taste and a flavour or two of some of the artists taking part, just small sound bites and little bits of flavours of the artists…

Amy Kingsmill - 'Bloom'

Amy Kingsmill – ‘Bloom’

AMY KINGSMILL will be performing her new piece Bloom on Thursday at 8pm. (Blood Ballet prep photographer- James Copeman). There’s some previous Organ coverage and a selection of imagery that went up online ahead of Amy’s performance at Play last year, explore it all here

organthing_amy_play

 

LYNNE BLACKBURN has been quite a regular at Cultivate, we always get so much out of Lynne being involved in out group shows and exhibitions. Now I’m no printmaker  and I don’t really know how she achieves what she does but her beautiful multi-screened prints are so alive with colour, with texture, depth and I guess (although I don’t know) alive with technical dexterity – and although there’s obviously a high degree of skill involved, with all due respect and admiration, I don’t really care that much about that side. I’m more interested in the result of whatever it is Lynne does, the interest is in the piece that ends up on the wall – beautiful colours, delicious repeats, glorious textures and often with a not to obvious slice of a social or political undercurrent,  There’s print makers and then there’s artists who really do explore the possibilities of print making, the layers and relationships of shape and colour, the glory of texture. Lynne Blackburn isn’t an artist who comes jumping off a wall demanding your immediate attention, her  work is just there, quietly waiting for you to take a proper look rather than a polite glance, art there to really be discovered and get lost in. I can spend hours just looking at  a Lynne Blackburn print, indeed I have done just that when we’ve had shows on, why do you think we keep asking her back, there’s something rather special about a Lynne Blackburn print, rather looking forward ot seeing what she has for us this Thursday evening, she promises a new series of pieces called “Ghost Buliding”, there’s one of them at the top of the page

Here’sa load of Lynne Blackburn images “borrowed” off social media and such, click on an image ot enlarge or run the slide show……

 

Debased, the artists, part 2: This One, Deborah Griffin, Apple Tart, Christophe Cachelin….

debased_sept2016CULTIVATE DEBASED at BSMT Space 22-25 September 2016. Opening night: Thursday 22 September, 6pm until 9pm then open: Friday 23, Saturday 24 and Sunday 25 September 11am until – 7pm each day.  at: BSMT Space, 5D Stoke Newington Road, Dalston, London, N16 8BH

CULTIVATE returns to Dalston and that beautiful basement knows as BSMT Space. In March it was DEBASER and slicing up eye balls, on September 22nd it will be DEBASED. Another gathering of pro-active artists and a maximalist exercise on cross-pollination. A room alive with contemporary painters, so-called street artists, performers, print makers and more…. Artists taking part include: ADAM ESPIRA, AMY KINGSMILLAPPLE TART,  BRUCE LOVELOCK,  CHRISTOPHER CACHELIN (aka Kidd Feather),  DEBORAH GRIFFINDIANE GOLDIEELIZABETH SANDFORD RICHARDSON, EMMA HARVEYIAN BAILEY, MUTINY,  LYNNE BLACKBURN, MARNIE SCARLETTMEGAN PICKERING, QUIET BRITISH ACCENT,  ROSSO, SEAN WORRALL,  THIS ONE….
Here’s a second small taste of some of the artists taking part….

This One

This One  getting all snake shaped….

This One is a Yorkshire man slowly painting all of London, well rapidly actually, This One is a prolific street artist who’s tattoo-flavoured illustrative style kind of stands out on the walls he’s adding to. Unlike a lot of the current crop of street artists This One’s standout black and white style translates rather well to canvas on a gallery wall, read and explore more over on the Organ pages today….

organthing_thisone_debased

Last year at the Cultivate take over of that condemned East London warehouse for the Play show, This One found and painted a couple of doors, here’s one of them sharing space with two of Deborah Griffins rather boldly-gothic canvases. Deborah will be joining us on Thursday as well….

This One and Deborah Griffin at Play (2015)

This One and Deborah Griffin at Play (2015)

Apple Tart is a performance artist, expect Apple Tart to be at the opening of Debased on Thursday evening, we don’t know what to expect…

Apple Tart

Apple Tart

The exciting thing about gathering artists who don’t usually share walls and gallery space together is making it all fit together as one….

Kidd Feather

Kidd Feather

Christophe Cachelin, aka Kidd Feather first came to our attention via his music a couple of years ago, London-based, born in Berne, Switzerland.  The Kidd has been experimenting with a lot of different media and techniques, his art kind of looks like his music sounds. His . felt tip penned sounds, his uplifting animal universes, his giant egg sculptures, simplistic nudes, ceramic masks and most recently his cut outs. The thing that unites all the sound and vision is Christophe’s use of colour. He’s had several group and solo exhibitions in London, amde several appearances in Cultivate show and most recently exhibited at the Yami Ichi Market at Tate Modern in May 2016. He say’s his biggest influences are Henri Matisse and Niki de Saint Phalle…

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Debased, the artists: Megan Pickering, Bruce Lovelock, Rosso….

debased_sept2016Debased, the latest Cultivate group show, opens at BSMT Space gallery over in Dalston (London N16), this coming Thursday….
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“This is about taking art and artists out of those comfortable little boxes that the London art scene appears to need, mixing things up, messing with the rules – a wallpaper printer (currently hanging in the V&A), alongside a street artist currently painting East London walls, a London dress-maker currently raging against London Fashion week, a contemporary painter currently exploring the view found through a circle, a performance artist freshly returned from her LA performance next to a pro-active artist still questioning the destruction of the mining communities”…
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Megan Pickering is one of the artists joining us for Debased, here’s a small Organ piece from January, Megan makes art that matters, art that has something to say, do check out more and explore that piece of video art on the Organ page….
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Over the next couple of days we shall have tastes of all the artists involved in Debased.  We’re excited about the mix of artists we have in this show. Emma and I spend ages debating who to invite, we’re out at shows all the time, we’re watching websites all the time, trading information, opinion, a lot of work goes in it to these Cultivate show, we don’t just pick names out of a hat…. …
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We always enjoy having Bruce Lovelock involved, we never quite know what to expect, it might be a mouse trap or a very painterly piece of his mind, it could well be anything, always rewarding, never obvious, a little more depth than most…
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“I imagine him as one of those artists who are discovered later on in life with hundreds of works stored away…I like his work, there is a dark strange edge there, I don’t see anything else out there like his work. It poses questions to me, rather than handing it all on a plate I do ‘feel’ from Bruce’s work…”
BRUCE LOVELOCK, Bow Arts (2012)

BRUCE LOVELOCK, Bow Arts (2012)

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Rosso is an artist who’s been building quite a reputation or herself in recent time. She’s first appeared at Cultivate when Emma invited her to take par in an International Women’s day wall of work down in Vyner Street a couple of years ago, since them the London-based Italian painted has taken part in a number of Cultivate shows. There’s a piece over on the Organ pages from back in late April of this year over on the Organ pages

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organthing_rosso_emerging

Debased, a maximalist art show in basement, opening this coming Thursday evening

debased_sept2016Been a few days over five years since Emma Harvey and I started this Cultivate thing, we’ll we had been cultivating before that, the Stinging Netil fair, the Hundred Paintings show and such, but it was just over five years ago that we formally started Cultivate. The first four years were on that now infamous corner smack bang in the middle of the now sadly missed Vyner Street, since then we’ve been moving around, nomadic contradictions, basements, warehouses, formal galleries, dog shows, beachfronts, railway bridges…

Next Thursday we’re back in Dalston, the edges of Hackney where east becomes north London Cultivate returns to Dalston and that beautiful basement known as BSMT Space. Back In March it was Debaser and slicing up eye balls, on September 22nd it will be Debased. Another gathering of pro-active artists and a maximalist exercise in cross-pollination. A room alive with contemporary painters, so-called street artists, performers, print makers, wallpaper creators and more…. . Opening on Thursday evening and then a short sharp shock of a show through the weekend and closing on Sunday, no messing about, just artists, walls, people and ongoing Cultivation 

Debaser, March 2016, Bruce Lovelock

Debaser, March 2016, Bruce Lovelock

Artists taking part include:
ADAM ESPIRA,
AMY KINGSMILL,
BRUCE LOVELOCK,
DEBORAH GRIFFIN,
DIANE GOLDIE,
EMMA HARVEY,
IAN BAILEY,
MUTINY,
CHRISTOPHER CACHELIN aka KIDD FEATHER,
LYNNE BLACKBURN,
MARNIE SCARLETT,
MEGAN PICKERING,
QUIET BRITISH ACCENT,
ROSSO,
SEAN WORRALL,
THIS ONE

And we rather expect one or two more may join us for the opening night and the weekend for the debased cross-pollination.  This is about taking art and artists out of those comfortable little boxes that the London art scene appears to need, mixing things up, messing with the rules – a wallpaper printer (currently hanging in the V&A), alongside a street artist currently painting East London walls, a London dress-maker currently raging against London Fashion week, a contemporary painter currently exploring the view found through a circle, a performance artist freshly returned from her LA performance next to a pro-active artist still questioning the destruction of he mining communities. Expect previews and features on all the artists here on these pages throughout the weekend and the days leading up to Thursday’s opening  (SW)

Debaser, March 2016

Debaser, March 2016

Diane Goldie...

Diane Goldie…

Bruce Lovelock

Bruce Lovelock

Debaser, March 2016, Rosso

Debaser, March 2016, Rosso

ORGAN THING: Gob on you ’cause you talk about art…

Over on Cultivate’s sister blog page, we write about art, music, art shows, painters, gigs, albums, we write about art, music, underculture.  A page goes up every day on the Organ website every single day, well almost, a thing of a day. Today’s Organ Thing of the Day was a bit of a reaction to a gallery who, instead of being pleased about a rather positive review we wrote about a show, chose to moan about how the review hadn’t been written in the accepted academically correct manner, there are rules about these kind of things you know, we can’t have just anyone writing about art you know! For those of you who don’t tune in for a daily dose of Organ, I thought we’d repost the piece here…  And so here it is, today’s Organ thing of the day…..

ORGAN THING: Gob on you ’cause you talk about art…

#43ArtDrop, Hackney Wick, July 2016

#43ArtDrop, Hackney Wick, July 2016

Art excites me, sharing news of where the art is to be found seems like a rather positive exciting thing to do, talking about art, writing about art, it excites me, posting up words, photos that hint at things to be found on the actual gallery walls should you choose to go actually experience it for yourself, gt t othat gallery, art is exciting! Posting links to galleries where the shows are happening, writing about art, sharing art, writing bout artists, art is exciting, art excites me,.

displace_opening42Art excites me enough to want to write about it, to erect signposts pointing the way to the energy of a rewarding painter that excite me, to bands that really matter. Art excites me, a really good gig excites me, going to see an in-your-face band gets me excited. An exciting art show thrills me, a new painting up on a street wall excites me, a new album (or a these days a new track on a soundcloud page) excites me (okay, maybe not so much whe nit comes to a soundcloud post). Going to galleries excites me, almost addictive, when’s the next one? Art excites me, that’s why I do all this, this is why Organ has carried on (in one fractured form or another) for far (far) too long now.

Not for one tiny moment is the suggestion here that we should dumb art or the coverage of art down, to suggest that is to insult the art, the artist and most of all the audience.

What doesn’t excite me is academic bullshit and all the dancing around architecture that comes with the coverage art, the intellectual elitism and art school formality that alienates rather than invites and engages. Writers, galleries, radio presenters, publications and journalists who think their words far more important than the art or artists they’re supposedly covering (at least the late Brian Sewell has some personality and a bit of credibility to add to his self-important arrogance, I rather miss him, at least there was some vitriolic substance there).

SPACE STUDIOS Summer opening 2016

SPACE STUDIOS Summer opening 2016, Wildcat Will giving zero…

There’s a tediously formal structure upheld by those who seem to think that writing about art and actually engaging and informing is a bad thing and that art should remain aloof, that art should remain an elitist sport. and that the coverage of art should be very very (very) academically formal, that galleries should be seemingly uninviting worlds (and no signs telling the general public where the art might be, heaven forbid no! Don’t tell them where the gallery is or that it might be actually open!). An art world only for those who like to stroke their formal chins and pontificate “in conversation” in a formal situation where the critic or writer is all, the gallery is in complete formal control and their world and word the law – the art and the artists are somewhere further down the pecking order.

Apparently art must always be presented “properly” and in the established formal way, the correct way, the only way – we don’t want your filthy punk rock attitudes here, we don’t want you here writing positive things in excited ways about the art in our galleries, upsetting the apple cart and the established way of doing things, no no no…

Thierry Noir, Howard Griffin Gallery, June 2016

Thierry Noir, Howard Griffin Gallery, June 2016

Maybe somewhere along the way during their expensive middle-class masters degree on how to be an art critic they forgot how exciting it all can be? Maybe they forgot how the sight of a Norman Ackroyd piece on the wall and the sun in that piece still glistening in your head a week later can be so damn exciting? Maybe they forgot the buzz of being down the front of a Miraculous Mule gig or how a new Aida Wilde paste-up cutting through the advertising noise and estate agents boards on a street wall can be so beautifully challenging? So exciting! Or getting lost in a new release from Sea Nymphs or the prospect of a PnkSlm night next week or how the energy and excitement of Julie Umerle’s on-going series of abstract paintings last week was conveyed so well on that stark white wall in Bermondsey. Art excites me.

Emma Harvey at Wall and Jones, art excites....

Emma Harvey at Wall and Jones, art excites….

Art excites me, journalists who’ve forgotten the emotion and excitement of standing in front of a thrilling painting and then wanting to write about it in an excited way and instead have to present it all like some formal academic piece of stick-up-yer-arse art-school essay writing three weeks after the show bore the hell out of me, they turn me off, tedious essays. This is 2016, the internet is our doorway, react now, share it, tell us about it! I don’t want some writer more concerned with the accepted formal way of doing it all “properly”, footnotes all in place and everything just as they were taught at art critic school, how very very unexciting, flip me, who the hell cares outside of some student trying to bluff their way through the same course you just finished? Where’s r excitement? Where’s the challenge?

Norman Ackroyd

Norman Ackroyd

If you really so wish to substitute the excitement of art for the art-school formality of a review conducted in the correct and proper way, and you want to moan about our way of doing it, then you really are in danger of just presenting it all as some kind of aloof elite club where most of us are made to feel like we are not welcome. All rules must be observed, a club where the critic is “in-conversation” and where the critic is the “star” and the artist an inconvenient after thought – the me me me writer who starts bleating when their name isn’t big enough on the page or in the credits or on the event advert. Did they really forget the thrill of it all? The adrenaline rush of an exciting piece of art?

Julie Umerle - Rewind

Julie Umerle – Rewind

Apparently a rather formal London gallery run by (we later learned) a rather formal art magazine had a problem with a very positive review we ran on these Organ pages only last week. The problem apparently was that, even though we had links all over the review, we had links to the gallery site as well as to the show’s (uncredited) formal statement on their own gallery website, none of that was enough. It wasn’t enough that we rushed home and stay up composing and then posting an excited review of a rather good show that was in their gallery in time for people to read it and hopefully engage with the show while the show was still actually on the walls of said gallery. Apparently it wasn’t enough that the quotes were in quotation marks and came with the very obvious links to the gallery statement, it wasn’t enough that we were very enthusiastic about a rather exciting show and that we were encouraging people to go while the show was still happening at the rather formal Art Project Space over in Bermondsey. None of that was enough because the small quote (that wasn’t credited on the gallery’s own website in the first place) wasn’t credited in a formal way by us and as you know there is a proper formal established way to do these things, the proper academic way, the rule of art that must be obeyed at all times. Jesuzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz h, who the hell cares?! The links were there, the words were there, thre quotation marks were there, go see the damn show before it ends, go explore the art! No, not enough, the me me me critic needed a name up in neon, the links ot her gallery were not enough, coverage of something happening in her space was not enough, the same critic who doesn’t ever appear to leave the white cube comfort of her formal gallery world to actually go check out anything outside of the formal oh so correct everything done the right way art bubble. I’m rather surprised she even noticed the review on the Organ page last week, I though what we said was of no importance what so ever? Why was she so bothered about some half-formed informal reviews on some website that isn’t part of her art establishment world? Sure what we say is of no importance?

Scott Hunt

Scott Hunt

Sometimes the art media and the establishment art galleries can be so full of their self-importance and it almost feels like it might be a crime to get excited about any of it. Do not smile in the art gallery, do not show emotion, do not get excited! Art excites me, going to art shows excites me, excited enough to want to share that excitement, it isn’t an academic exercise in formal footnotes, everything formal and proper, punctuation all in place (shall we have a full stop now?). We’re not handing it in at the end of term so it can sit collecting dust in the library for ever more, that was a damn fine show last week, the paint excited me, the process the artist went through excited me. We’ll probably go to another exciting show next week and we’ll probably have ten largers then have ten more , then gob on you, then write about it in the wrong informal fractured way again, art excites us, art school formalirt bores the hell out of me. Wonder if Chris judge Smith has finished his new album yet? Gob on you ’cause you talk about what? I’m out of here, got another art show to go to… (SW)

 

Gob on you ’cause you talk about art, enough of all that, we’ve just be interrupted by Gregory Jacobsen again, he the painter and he of Lovely Little Girls (let’s give him proper credit now, and not in a footnore either!). Here comes The Four Three – “Mike Hagedorn, trombonist for Lovely Little Girls and Cheer Accident, has a new band with Alex Perkolup and Jeff Goulet, also of Lovely Little Girls. Here is them playing the other night at Beat Kitchen. I have no idea what name to drop in order to entice you to watch and listen. just know that there is soprano trombone doubled with voice. So there”.

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We really should have a footnote, maybe we’ll add one to every page from now on? Today’s footnote is a Julia Maddison piece of art, julia’s art excites….

JULIA MADDISON

JULIA MADDISON